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Friday, 19 January 2018

2018 - Adsense for Youtube New Ad Monetization Rules - Small Channels

January 2018 Youtube announced changes to their Advertising rules relating to channels that show Ads...



10000 Views
4000 Hours per Year
1000 Channel Subscribers...

This pretty much kills of 90% of small hardworking content creators.... or as YouTube puts it...

"Though these changes will affect a significant number of channels, 99% of those affected were making less than $100 per year in the last year, with 90% earning less than $2.50 in the last month. Any of the channels who no longer meet this threshold will be paid what they’ve already earned based on our AdSense policies..."

So here's the thing... We are a small channel and like almost all the other small channels we know, have a few loyal subscribers. The content created is created from passion and a willingness to make a happier positive difference... We are not going to argue if this move is good or bad and all the stuff you would see on Forbes etc... Here are the facts...



We began our content creating careers 3 years ago... and when the first email to monetize a video came from google we were excited... Thinking it would change our lives we enabled and signed up. The Ads were on the video and boom... We were Youtube Partners... How nice it sounded... 

Adsense payments rules indicate a R1000.00/$100.00 threshold... Which means you can withdraw the money only after the amount passes the threshold. 

The first year passed and the amount was ... Not alot... Not even 10% of the threshold... Not even dinner, a nice meal or a day out at the park... Our posts were more informative than created for viral. They target specific niches of business and people. So we assumed the penny's were a result of this. Furthermore we cannot withdraw the pennies due to the Threshold. Ok... the good thing is we are not relying on this partnership for our daily bread and butter. Work continues as normal. 

You will blow more money and time and data... Much more...

So we logged back into Google last year around July 2017... and things were not much different. The figures had not yet reached the threshold and had peaked to about 80%... So basically 90% of small advertisers will not or never reach the threshold. So their $2.50 will never get paid. But the advertiser payed google along time ago. The money is has earned interest and grown exponentially. Now our figures are not Youtube Preferred figures or anything like that but they are good and target specific niches. 



To cut the long story short... Most channels and small businesses may get to 10000 views, with a little godly luck may get the 1000 subscribers but will never reach 4000 hours of views... That is 240 000 minutes. Even if you do... the second later Google can announce more stricter changes which leaves you blank again.

So as a small time business you would be way better of if you focused your business on business. Google is blaming the new rules on "Bad Actors" however unless and until google can humanly verify and check all channels rather than using machine learning algorithms... problems will continue to arise. True human potential and individuals will never be recognized, found and these individuals will move along.

Zaheer Bux - 19/01/2018

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Tuesday, 17 February 2015

How To Make a Great Business Logo

Your company's logo is the foundation of your business branding. It is probably the first interaction that you will have with your customers. An effective logo can establish the right tone and set the proper ethos. After years of crafting logos for different projects, I've come up with a set of questions that I always ask myself before delivering a new logo.


1. What emotions does the logo evoke?



Above all design guidelines, the most important criterion is whether the logo reflects the character of the company. The emotions that the logo evoke should be appropriate to the company values. For example, the Disney logo evokes a sense of happiness and optimism. The curvy, fun typeface is appropriate for a company that has been making cartoons and animated pictures for kids. However, a similar logo style on a sales platform would not be appropriate.



Designers should understand the psychology of colors and the effect that typeface has on the design of a great logo. For example, green promotes relaxation and usually reflects growth, health, and the environment. Red, on the other hand, may evoke danger and passionate emotions. Similarly for typefaces, Garamond, Helvetica, and Comic Sans all elicit very different sentiments. Serif fonts like Garamond promote the idea of respect and tradition, and are hence more suitable for an environment that demands integrity such as a university or a news publisher. Sans Serif fonts like Helvetica are clean and modern, and are well suited for high-tech businesses.


Casual script fonts like Comic Sans are probably best left for fun companies such as toy companies. A good understanding of the psychology of colors, typefaces, and shapes is an important part of making a great logo.


The styling of the Disney logo is appropriate for a company that aims to be fun, but such a style would not be appropriate for a sales platform company.


2. What's the meaning behind the logo?



Behind every great logo is a story. A great logo is not about slapping your business name on a generic shape, which is why choosing from ready-made logos is a poor idea. A logo has to have a meaningful story. A good designer first understands the culture of the company, the tone of the product, and the vision of the business, much before embarking on ideas for the logo. The end result of a quality logo is reflective of the philosophy and values of the company.


The arrow in the logo represents that Amazon sells everything from A to Z and the smile on the customer's face when they buy a product.


3. Will the logo stand the test of time?

How will the logo look in two, 10, 20 years? Designers should avoid getting sucked into flavor-of the-month trends. Trends like ultra-thin fonts and flat shadows are design styles that will probably not stand the test of time. Simple is far better than complex. A simple yet memorable logo can be used in 20 years without looking dated.


A good way to test the logo is to let it sit with you for a while before releasing it. Some logos grow with you—the more you look at it, the more you like it. Some logos start to feel nauseating after a while—the more you look at it, the more you hate it. If after a couple of weeks with the logo you find it boring, the logo is probably not strong or timeless enough.


The simplistic outline and shape of the Apple Inc. logo allows it to endure the test of time. The first prototype of the logo would definitely not be suitable today.


4. Is it unique? Can it be instantly recognizable?



A great logo is distinctive, memorable, and recognizable. Even if you have only seen it once, you should still be able to remember what it looks like after a period of time. A good way to test this is to show your logo to a friend, then cover it up and have your friend describe the logo in a week. A fresh pair of eyes can be very effective in figuring out the most memorable components of a logo.
In addition, if the logo reminds you of others you have seen, it is not distinct enough.


The logos of Path and Pinterest are very similar.


5. How does it look in black and white?



When I begin designing a logo, I always start in black and white. Designing with this limitation first forces you to make sure that the logo is recognizable purely by its shape and outline, and not by its color. A strong logo is one that is still memorable just by its contours.


A one-color logo also provides the benefit of using your brand easily in multiple mediums with different backgrounds and textures.


It is much harder to recognize the National Geographic symbol once we remove its signature yellow colour.


6. Is it clear and distinct in small dimensions?




Another way to make sure logos are simple and recognizable is to scale it down dramatically. Even at tiny resolutions, a strong logo should still be recognizable at a glance. This is also a good test to make sure that the logo is not complicated with unnecessary design flourishes. Here, you see that the Nike, McDonalds, Twitter, and WWF logos are still very distinct at small sizes. The GE and Starbucks logos are far more cluttered, and less recognizable when they are small.




These are not hard-and-fast rules, just guidelines for making an effective logo. It is still possible to make a strong, complicated logo, but understand the trade-offs.


This article was edited and republished with permission from the author. Read the original here.


  Lo Min Ming - cofounder of Pixelapse, a visual version control platform for designers.


Fast Company